Premium Lens Intraocular Lens Implants (IOL)

What is the Difference Between Standard and Premium Lens Implants? 

It used to be over the past six decades that the only choice for a cataract surgery implant was the standard ‘monofocal’ lens implants or intraocular lenses (IOLs). They still offer good functional ‘distance’ vision, but reading glasses are almost always needed for near vision.

If you want to be less dependent on eyeglasses or contact lenses, or if you have astigmatism, then the FDA approved Premium Intraocular Lenses (IOLs) are a better choice. Because of the advanced technology utilized in these Premium IOLs, your vision may be better than it would be if the standard IOL was used.

IOL on blue background

Why is it Important to Decide Which IOL You Want Before Your Cataract Surgery?

Once you have cataract surgery, you cannot change your mind to upgrade to a Premium IOL. That is why it is so important to really think about this decision ahead of time. At The Eye Associates, we strive to answer all your questions and help you through this decision process. We understand that your lifetime of good vision depends on it.

Categories of Lens Implants

Monofocal

Correct astigmatism, giving good distance vision but you will still require reading glasses.

Multifocal

Work somewhat like a progressive or bifocal eyeglass lens by offering you an expanded range of vision, distance and near.

Accommodative

Have a design that allows the lens to flex slightly when your eye’s natural focusing muscles move, thereby mimicking your own eye’s natural ability to see at multiple distances, much like before you became presbyopic and needed reading glasses.

Toric

Corrects astigmatism

Trifocal

Have different zones on the lens to correct different types of vision

Monofocal

A lens with a single focal point, designed to correct cataracts and provide distance vision while offering enhanced image quality

NearRed X
IntermediateRed X
DistanceGreen check
AstigmatismRed X

Monofocal Toric

Monofocul lens

A lens with a single focal point, designed to correct both cataracts and pre-existing astigmatism, providing distance vision

NearRed X
IntermediateRed X
DistanceGreen check
AstigmatismGreen check

Multifocal

A premium lens designed to correct cataracts and presbyopia in order to provide a full range of vision for patients

NearGreen check
IntermediateGreen check
DistanceGreen check
AstigmatismRed X

Multifocal Toric

A lens with a single focal point, designed to correct cataracts and provide distance vision while offering enhanced image quality

NearGreen check
IntermediateGreen check
DistanceGreen check
AstigmatismGreen check

Trifocal

A lens with a single focal point, designed to correct cataracts and provide distance vision while offering enhanced image quality

NearGreen check
IntermediateGreen check
DistanceGreen check
AstigmatismGreen check

Do you think you may be suffering with cataracts? 

Lenses Available at The Eye Associates

PanOptix & PanOptix Toric

AcrySof IQ PanOptix IOL is the first and only Trifocal lens implant in the US. This IOL offers patients an outstanding range of vision. When PanOptix patients were asked if they needed eyeglasses after cataract surgery with this implant, 80.5% of them said that they never wore glasses, and another 11.4% said that they rarely used them.

Vivity & Vivity Toric

The biggest thing that makes the Vivity lens different is it uses proprietary, non-diffractive technology called X-Wave. X-Wave technology is unique because it uses all available light around it to create an extended range of vision.

There are no gaps in sight or multiple separate focal points that split the wavefront, which other diffractive multifocal lenses do. Instead, with the Vivity lens, you can see exceptionally well at a distance and intermediate distances while still seeing close-up things.

You can even see well in any lighting, whether it’s bright or dim. The Vivity lens will protect your eyes from damaging UVA and UVB rays from the sun and filters the blue light emitted from digital devices like your television or cell phone.

Schedule a Consultation to Learn about Your Options

The first step to find out if you need cataract surgery is a comprehensive eye exam with one of our Board Certified Physicians at The Eye Associates.

Frequently Asked Questions About Premium Lens Implants

If you have vision loss due to cataracts, the good news is that the cost of these high tech lenses and the associated services are partially covered by Medicare and private medical insurance. The patient is responsible for payment of that portion which exceeds the charge of the standard “monofocal” single focus IOL, as well as any copayments and deductibles.

If you do not have a cataract, most insurance companies will not provide any coverage. They usually consider this a cosmetic rather than a medical necessity. The patient then would be responsible for the full payment of the surgery, lens implant and surgery center fees. Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover can be used, and we also offer several affordable financing plans, including an interest-free option, for those wanting to finance the procedure.

Yes, the patient selection criteria requires that both eyes be done, generally within several weeks of each other, in order to achieve optimum results.

Presently, if you have already had cataract surgery, you are not a candidate for these high tech lenses. However, we are hoping that in the future, we will have high tech lenses that will be approved for patients who have already had cataract surgery. Then we will be able to surgically insert a second IOL, known as a “piggy-back” lens, in front of your existing fixed-focus IOL in order to give you vision both near and far.

If you’ve had LASIK or some other type of vision correction procedures, you still may be a candidate as long as your eyes are in good health.

If you’ve had LASIK or some other type of vision correction procedures, you still may be a candidate as long as your eyes are in good health.

Yes, patients receiving these high tech IOLs usually experience an “adjustment period.” It generally takes 6 to 12 weeks for the brain to learn to “see” up close and distance with the new lenses. Also, some people report halos or glare around lights while getting used to them. For most, this issue diminishes over time. However, for some it never completely goes away. More people report that the ability to see near and far greatly outweighs any visual side effects associated with these IOLs.

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