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How Do I Know If I Need An Eye Exam?

Many people believe that eye exams are only for people that wear glasses or contacts. Here are some other reasons to have your eyes examined:

Did you know that diabetes is one of the leading causes of blindness? Diabetics need to have a dilated exam at least once per year to look for diabetes changes in their eyes. High blood pressure can cause changes to the blood vessels inside the eyes and lead to complications. Cholesterol can also be seen in the blood vessels and can cause complications.

Some common eye diseases do not have any symptoms and will not alert you to come in for an appointment. Glaucoma slowly affects your side vision until it becomes so advanced that you are only left with a small tunnel of vision. Macular degeneration in its early stages may not cause problems initially, but in the advanced stages central vision will be affected. Both glaucoma and macular degeneration have a genetic component, so there is an increased risk if a member of your immediate family has been diagnosed with either of these conditions.

The Eye Associates offer patients efficient and accurate eye exams in Bradenton. If you a local Bradenton eye patient, do not hesitate to set up your eye examinations with our top eye experts.

What Kind of Information Should I Share With My Eye Doctor At My Next Eye Exam?

1. Eye health problems that run in your family such as macular
degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, etc.

2. A list of prescription and non-prescription medications that you
take.

3. How you use your eyes at work such as computer use, work
outdoors, lighting, etc.

4. How you use your eyes at play such as hobbies, sports, etc.

5. Eye symptoms and difficulties that you are experiencing such as
headaches, blurred vision, sensitivity to light, etc.

– By Richard Hector, MD

Tear Osmolarity Testing for Dry Eyes

Accredited Dry Eye Center logo

Accredited Dry Eye Center Logo

Dry Eyes

Did you know that the human eye has over 2 million working parts?  Imagine all those 2 million parts working beautifully, and then suddenly there is a poor tear film covering the cornea, preventing a clear image from being formed for your brain’s vision center to use when you read, drive and text, causing dry eyes.

Achieving the right volume and mixture of lubricating fluids to be available for delivery with each blink is no easy task. To better analyze your tear film, we now can do a simple and quick in office test (called a tear osmolarity test) that not only helps us diagnose Dry Eye Disease, but also allows us to monitor the progress patients are making in their treatment programs. In the past, we were not able to objectively quantify the quality of a patient’s tears. Now we can do that with the Tearlab equipment.

When the tear osmolarity (salt content) test first came out, the results were not very consistent.  This was at first felt to be a deficiency in the machine.  Now we understand that this variability is the hallmark of Dry Eye Disease. Those of us who suffer from dry eyes are very aware of this variability.  We have our good days, and sometimes only a few good hours in the day. Many days are filled coping with the familiar battle of fluctuating vision and discomfort.

What cannot vary, though, is your dry eye treatment program. Maintain your fluid intake; do not over indulge in caffeinated beverages; apply your warm compresses, follow your lid hygiene regimen; and take your Omega 3 and Vitamin D. Do everything you can to give those 2 million parts in your eyes a clear image to work with!

Your Dry Eye Coach, Richard Hector

Important Reason for Eye Exams – Safety

<img alt; "safety of mom important to family"

Happy Mom with daughter and granddaughter.

Safety as we age is the most important thing. We all worry about the safety of our parents. Poor vision can have many adverse effects, such as depression, car accidents, and medication errors, but none of these are more concerning than a fall. Falls are among the leading cause of death for people age 65+, and people with low vision are at even greater risk. Reduced contrast, decreased depth perception, and a reduced field of vision can inhibit balance and the ability to detect obstacles. Increased safety is one of the most compelling reasons to have an annual eye exam.

Visual Factors That Impact Falls

Reduced field of vision – Objects that cannot be seen are a common cause of falls. Eye diseases such as Glaucoma, Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy can rob one’s vision. Glaucoma affects ones peripheral vision, while Macular Degeneration and Diabetic Retinopathy can cause blind spots in the central vision.
Reduced depth perception – People with vision in just one eye may have problems judging distances, making it more dangerous to negotiate obstacles.
Reduced contrast sensitivity – Reduced vision also causes reduced contrast making obstacles and clutter hard to see. Curbs become nearly invisible and many objects can fade into the background.

Eye Exams Save Sight and Increase Safety

Increased safety is one of the most compelling reasons to have an annual eye exam. Did you know that some eye diseases do not have warning signs, and many can only be detected with a dilated eye exam. Cataracts can affect sight so gradually that you don’t notice the decreased vision. And half of all people with glaucoma are unaware that they even have the disease. Also, diabetics with diabetic retinopathy often do not experience symptoms when the disease is at its most treatable stage. The key to keeping good vision starts with the early detection and treatment.

Call 1-866-865-2020 or click here for a comprehensive eye exam today!